Sumner H. Slichter

  • New Goals for the Unions

    Crooked labor leaders in their cynical misuse of funds have incensed the American consumer, and the unions in too many instances have not been able to eliminate corrupt officers. SUMNER H. SLICHTER, the noted economist, takes the long view: Will the labor leaders regain a responsible authority, without which there can be no productive cooperation in this country?

  • The Passing of Keynesian Economics

    A political scientist with undiminished belief in the potential of the American economy, SUMNER H. SLICHTERis today Lamont Professor at Harvard University and an analyst of business trends whose forecasts are carefully listened to by management and labor alike.

  • The Growth of Moderation

    “The economic and social structure of the country,” writes SUMNER H. SLICHTER,one of our leading economists and the Lamont University Professor at Harvard, “has undergone a near revolution.”In the article which follows, Mr. Slichter documents beyond question the powerful expansion of the American middle class; he explains why this has come about; and he shows that the voice of the middle class is the voice which is now demanding moderation in both political parties.

  • Labor's New Victory: Threat or Promise?

    Paeans of praise from labor and angry expostulations from the National Association of Manufacturers bave followed the new agreements between the United Automobile Workers of America and Ford and General Motors. But, in the long run, what are likely to be the effects of these negotiations on the American economy? We turn for an evaluation to SUMNER H. SLIGHTER, Lamont University Professor at Harvard.

  • Have We Conquered the Business Cycle?

    As a regular contributor to the Atlantic, SUMNER H. SLIGHTER has repeatedly pointed out the enormous potential of the American economy. We believe that his opinions have been consistently validated by subsequent events, and that prophets of gloom would do well to consider the facts with which he supports his quiet confidence in our ability to prosper. Born in Madison, Mr. Slichter took his A.B. degree at the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1918, and is today Lamont University Professor at Harvard.

  • Undermining the Foundations

    Chairman B. Carroll Reece and his House Committee to Investigate Tax-Exempt Foundations are convinced that the great philanthropic foundations are part of a “diabolical conspiracy" to promote socialism in the United States. In May the committee began a series of hearings after Norman Dodd, research director of the committee, reported that a group of “little known" persons “have established tight control" over education and research. The country’s foremost economist, SUMNER H. SLICHTER, examines the Dodd report and shows why the committee decided to shut up shop, at least for the present.

  • The Prospects Are Bright

    As a regular contributor to the Atlantic, SUMNER H. SLICHTER has repeatedly pointed out the enormous potential of the American economy. We believe that his opinions have been consistently validated by subsequent events, and that prophets of gloom would do well to consider the facts with which he supports his quiet confidence in our ability to prosper. Born in Madison, Mr. Slichter took his A.B. degree at the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1918, and is today Lamont University Professor at Harvard.

  • The Growth of Competition

    There is a popular belief that Big Business in America as it has grown bigger has invoked monopoly in place of the competition by which we used to live. Is this in fact the case? The answer is of vital interest at a time when our economy must be at full strength to prevail in the tug of peace. SUMNER H. SLICHTERwho has devoted a great deal of study to the article which follows, is Lamont Professor at Harvard University,an economist widely respected from coast to coast.

  • More Imports Needed

    “Can the Republicans do what the Democrats have failed to do —~ namely, provide our foreign policy with an adequate economic foundation?" To find a constructive answer to this question, we turn to a leading American economist, SUMNER H. SLIGHTER,Lament professor at I harvard University, and it is his conclusion that “rarely has a country been so well situated to give great help to the rest of the world by policies which would also enhance its own economic welfare.”But will we do it?

  • Productivity: Still Going Up

    “Productivity in the United Stales,” writes SUMNER H. SLICHTER,“has been growing faster and faster, and the fact that it is far higher than in any other country suggests the need of revising some widely accepted ideas.” A foremost American economist, Lamont Professor at Harvard University, Mr. Slichter is the author of What’s Ahead for American Business, which was published last year under the Atlantic-Little, Brown imprint.

  • Rearmament: Too Much, Too Soon

    Will the present plan to rearm Western Europe against Communism bring a disastrous inflation and reduce the living standards of our allies? A foremost American economist, Lament Professor at Harvard University, SUMNER H. SLIGHTER believes we must recapture the vision and common sense that inspired the Marshall Plan. Drastic changes, he says, should be made in the huge outlays recently authorized by Congress.

  • Business and Armament

    “Our conflict with Russia,” says SUMNER H. SLICHTER, “is not merely a competition in arms; it is fundamentally a contest in production —and a long-run contest” The article which follows is his constructive blueprint of what we must do to step up our production, and of what the domestic effects will be, assuming that our conflict with Russia stops short of total war. A nationally known economist. Mr. Slichter is the Lamont Professor at Harvard University.

  • Our Best Defense

    The next ten years, SUMNER H. SLIGHTER writes, will be one of our most crucial decades. He looks for the continuance of the cold war and for a defense outlay that may, by 1960, be double what it is today; and then not unhopefully he goes on to discuss the short-term and long-time trends in our working life. An economist who has steadily grown in the regard of American management and labor, Mr. Slichter stands today as one of the most fair-minded and unflurried analysts of the forces which make our wheels go round.

  • Better Than We Think

    Is this, as the pessimists say, "a time for despair ? Or could it he that we who have been working in a democracy have taken for granted, and so overlooked, the notable progress achieved since 1910? According to Sumner II. Slichter, ours is one of the great creative eras in history. Born in Madison, he took his A.B. at the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, and is today Lament University Professor at Harvard and chairman of the Research Advisory Board of the Committee for Economic Development.

  • How Big in 1980?

    SUMNER H. SLICHTER, the Harvard economist, is not given to wide-eyed predictions, and when he says that by 1980 — only thirty years away — income of 416 billion on a work week of only thirty hours and with a labor force of 72 million people, the hardheaded will want to know how. Well, here is his forecast in detail. Born in Madison. he took his A.B. degree at the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1918, and is today Lamont University Professor at Harvard and chairman of the Research Advisory Board of the Committee for Economic Development.

  • Are Profits Too High?

    Philip Murray, spokesman for the CIO, has argued that wages must be increased to keep pace with living costs and that the increases can be paid out of profits without increasing prices. SUMNER H. SLICHTER, on the other hand, believes that profits are not high enough if we are to have the expanding industrial plant which this country needs. Economist and teacher, Mr. Slichter has been a mediator in many difficult labor disputes. Born in Madison, he took his A.B. degree at the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1918, and is today Lamont University Professor at Harvard and chairman of the Research Advisory Board of the Committee for Economic Development.

  • What Do the Strikes Teach Us?

  • Sixty Million Jobs

  • Jobs After the War

  • The Labor Crisis