May 29, 2019 (Washington, D.C.)—The Atlantic today announced two new senior editors joining the staff of the print magazine: Laurie Abraham and Thomas Gebremedhin. Abraham, currently executive features editor at New York magazine, and Gebremedhin, who joins The Atlantic from WSJ Magazine, where he was culture editor, will both expand the range of stories and subjects covered across the magazine. They begin this summer and will be based in New York.

The hires were announced today by editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, editor of the magazine Don Peck, and deputy editor of the magazine Denise Wills.

Abraham will bring her omnivorous interests to a wide range of subjects at The Atlantic—with a focus on producing great narratives. Abraham comes to The Atlantic from New York magazine, where she served as executive features editor. Prior to that role, she was a senior editor and executive editor at ELLE, and a contributor to The New York Times Magazine. She's the author of Mama Might Be Better Off Dead: The Failure of Health Care in Urban America and The Husbands and Wives Club: A Year in the Life of a Couples Therapy Group.

In his new role, Gebremedhin will immediately enrich the magazine’s coverage of culture and the arts, even as he expands his purview into politics, technology, and other subjects. Gebremedhin was previously the culture editor at WSJ Magazine, where he edited features for the print magazine and covered culture for the website. He also conducted interviews for the magazine; his subjects have included Glenn Close, Marissa Mayer, Timothee Chalamet, Margaret Atwood, Jonathan Lethem, Patti Smith, RuPaul, and Saorise Ronan. Before joining the Journal in 2015, he was an assistant editor at Random House and a features assistant at Vogue.

Abraham and Gebremedhin join the magazine staff in the midst of a run of highly influential cover stories: March’s cover called on Congress to “Impeach Donald Trump,” starting a national debate that continues today; April’s cover, “How Much Immigration Is Too Much,” examined America’s immigration crisis, and recommended new legislation to better enforce the border; and the June cover, on newsstands now, suggests that the Catholic Church “Abolish the Priesthood,” making the argument for the end of clericalism to preserve the religion.  

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