The Atlantic’s business team has published the most comprehensive and only searchable database of President-elect Trump’s financial-disclosure filings with the Federal Election Commission, offering the best glimpse to date into what he owns and owes in the absence of full tax returns. We made this public: converting these disclosures from wieldy PDFs into a Google spreadsheet to make them more readily accessible to readers and the press. The data can be found and downloaded here.

The FEC forms remain the only public records of Trump’s finances. Though the forms have been online since they were filed in July 2015 and May 2016, they have so far only been available in PDF format. Their length (92 pages and 104 pages respectively) and format makes them borderline unreadable; the text is not searchable, and can’t be easily copied in most browsers.

Like the disclosure forms themselves, the spreadsheet is divided into several sections, each of which provides potentially useful information about the president-elect’s business endeavors:

  • The first sheet lists every position that Trump held at the time of filing, or had held as recently as 2013, outside of the presidency.

  • The second lists some 188 assets, from endeavors in everything from real estate to beauty pageants to books, and the income Trump derives from each.

  • The next three note his apparently ongoing agreement with the Screen Actors Guild, his sources of compensation exceeding $5,000 per year (none), and his wife Melania’s ongoing licensing deals.

  • The next lists several of the financial institutions with which the president-elect has outstanding debt, such as Deutsche Bank, to which the Trump Organization owes billions of dollars.

  • The last sheet discloses the ownership structures of some 532 companies and corporations with which Trump is involved.

The spreadsheet is embedded in the article page and can be viewed alone here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1pcGitimzMCsZ_DnnOZFQswywjc-uimWQ90qAFsoHj6Y/edit?usp=sharing

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