Washington, D.C. (June 3, 2015)--As the current school year comes to a close, The Atlantic will host its inaugural Education Summit on Monday, June 15, convening some of the country’s most prominent voices in education for a day of in-depth discussion on the biggest issues affecting America’s students, teachers, and school systems, spanning from early childhood development to higher education.

New York City Department of Education Chancellor Carmen Fariña and DC Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson will take up the national Common Core education standards and the challenges of providing equal education opportunities. The program will also convene leaders in higher education, including President Eduardo Padrón of Miami Dade College and Arizona State University President Michael Crow. They will discuss defining issues shaping the future of America’s universities, including the role of community colleges and how to build a more inclusive and supportive education infrastructure for underserved students. President Crow will appear alongside Amanda Ripley, author of The Atlantic’s May cover story, “The Upwardly Mobile Barista,” which documents Arizona State’s revolutionary partnership with Starbucks that aims to send thousands of employees to college.

Additional speakers confirmed to-date include:

  • Marc Brackett, Director, Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence

  • Steve Bumbaugh, Manager, Breakthrough Schools: DC, CityBridge Foundation

  • Nick Ehrmann, Founder and CEO, Blue Engine

  • Mary Hamm, Starbucks Barista featured in “The Upwardly Mobile Barista

  • Mike Johnston, Colorado State Senator (D-Denver)

  • Peg Tyre, Author, The Good School

  • Randi Weingarten, President, American Federation of Teachers

The Education Summit will also showcase the winner of The Atlantic and College Board Writing prize, a new writing contest created and presented in partnership by The Atlantic and the College Board. The annual contest seeks to identify young writers from around the world and to instill the analytical-writing skills critical to success in college and professional life. For their essays, students wrote about important documents from American history, including Abigail Adams’ “Remembering the Ladies” letter, Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address, and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” Entries were judged by representatives from both The Atlantic and the College Board.  The winning submission will receive $5,000 and publication in the September issue of The Atlantic.

Media interested in attending the Summit should reply directly to this email or contact The Atlantic’s Samantha Zeldin (szeldin@theatlantic.com or 202-266-7196).

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Walton Family Foundation are founding underwriters of the event. The College Board is a presenting underwriter.

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