Washington, D.C. (January 9, 2015)—Last year marked the strongest for job growth since the 1990s. Despite this outlook, employers across sectors find themselves running into a persistent challenge: finding workers with the skills they need to fill open jobs. On the morning of the State of the Union Address and ahead of the U.S. Conference on Mayors, The Atlantic will convene mayors, business and education leaders for its first City Makers Summit, a town hall focused on economic prospects and assessing the skills gap. The event will be Tuesday, January 20 from 9 a.m. to noon, Eastern Standard Time, at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. The City Makers Summit is underwritten by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

The half-day event will include conversation with several mayors, including Steven Fulop of Jersey City, Betsy Hodges of Minneapolis, Kasim Reed of Atlanta, and Nan Whaley of Dayton. Interviews will center on the opportunities and challenges of building a bigger, better, and more qualified, American workforce. Sessions will cover youth development initiatives, trends in manufacturing, mentorship and “soft skills,” and more. Also joining the program are Melody Barnes, former White House domestic policy counsel, Makers Row founders Matthew Burnett and Tanya Menendez, DC Central Kitchen CEO Mike Curtin, and Freeman Hrabowski, the president of the University of Maryland Baltimore City.

The Atlantic’s Washington Editor-at-Large Steve Clemons and National Correspondent James Fallows will moderate conversations throughout the morning.

Media interested in attending should contact The Atlantic’s Sydney Simon (ssimon@theatlantic.com). The event will be webcast live on The Atlantic’s Events Channel. Follow the conversation on Twitter via @Atlantic_LIVE, and by using the hashtag #CityMakers. Full agenda to be released in the coming weeks.

AT A GLANCE:
The Atlantic’s City Makers Summit
Tuesday, January 20, 2015
9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. (8:30 a.m. Guest Arrival)

The Newseum
Knight Broadcast Studio
555 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20001

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