Daphne Zepos
Daphne Zepos ranks among the most outspoken and dynamic cheese advocates in the United States. More +
  • Assembling a Patriotic Cheese Platter

    Honor Independence Day and Bastille Day with ambassador cheeses from the U.S. and France.

  • Cheeses to Welcome Summer

    Summer calls for a mix of strong and mild cheeses that have one thing in common: they can hold up in the heat.

  • A New Use For Goat Cheese

    Goat cheese isn't just for spreading on crackers; this cheesemonger shows how to use it to make dessert.

  • The Art of America's Cheese-Makers

    A trip to the Seattle Cheese Festival makes the author realize how many wonderful cheeses are made in the U.S. Elbowing through the crowds at the 100-year-old Pike Place Market, she discovers countless gems.

  • Welcome Back, Roquefort

    Days after the U.S. dropped threatened tariffs on luxury food imports from Europe, the author celebrates a classic French cheese and ponders what life would have been without it. She also offers a theory for how American officials were convinced to cancel the taxes.

  • A Cheese of Romance and Transition

    Named after a band of French Resistance guerrillas, Fleur de Maquis epitomizes the end of winter. It is rubbed with rosemary, juniper berries, fennel seeds, and tiny red chili peppers. A fresh, mild, moist sheep's milk cheese made on the island of Corsica in the Mediterranean.

  • Deeply Inhaling a Prizewinning Cheddar

    From Wisconsin's Carr Valley, Snow White Goat Cheddar gives off the aroma of toffee and tastes even better. The wheel weighs around 38 pounds, and develops a mottled, gray, and white surface. And it won Best of Show at the Winter Artisan American Cheese Fair. The winning cheddar.

  • Who Are These People, "Cheesemongers"?

    As American cheese begins to edge in on the European-dominated cheese world of old, increasingly prominent U.S. cheesemongers face an existential crisis of sorts. The cheese revolution has many questioning who they are, what they do, and -- most importantly -- what they should be called.