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Trials of Spring

The Murder of a Libyan Revolutionary

Jun 22, 2015 | 6 videos
Video by Cameron Hickey and Zainab Salbi

Salwa Bugaighis was an outspoken human rights lawyer who became a leader in Libya's uprising and its most prominent female face. By spring of 2014, she had left Benghazi because she knew she would be targeted for her political views, but she risked a trip back home to cast her vote on Election Day. That night, on June 25, 2014, Salwa was assassinated in her own home and her husband was kidnapped. The murder marked a continued downwards spiral for Libya and its hopes for democracy. "It was a shock for the whole society, for Benghazi, for Libya," Iman Bugaighis, Salwa's sister, says in this film. "It was like an earthquake."

This is the third video in The Trials of Spring, a six-part series about women who were in the front lines of the revolutions of the Arab Spring.

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Author: Nadine Ajaka

About This Series

A six-part series about women who were in the front lines of the revolutions of the Arab Spring