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While Apple doesn't often issue recalls on their devices, they have determined that a batch of iPhone 5 devices have wonky batteries. The battery issue caused some iPhone 5 devices to "suddenly experience shorter battery life or need to be charged more frequently." Apple says only a "very small percentage" of iPhones sold are affected, but did not give an exact number. The affected devices were sold between September 2012 and January 2013

Here's how to find out if your device is affected. 

1. Find Your iPhone's serial number 

You'll need the serial number to prove your iPhone has legitimate battery issues. To find the serial number for your phone, go to Settings > General > About > Serial Number. It is about halfway down the page. 

via Apple.

2. Enter your iPhone's serial number on the Battery Replacement Program website

Enter the number into the Eligibility box and press Submit. 

3. If your iPhone is not eligible...

Even if you get the message that your phone is ineligible, you might be able to get a refund. If you paid for a new battery during the lifetime of your phone, the Replacement Program will offer you a refund for that purchase. 

4. If your iPhone is eligible... 

Head on over to an Apple store or an authorized service shop. If your phone is eligible for the replacement, you'll need to resolve any other damage first, as that can get in the way of the battery replacement. So, say you have a cracked screen, you will have to fix that first (and perhaps pay for it, depending on your warranty.) After that, Apple will replace the battery for free.

Be sure to backup your iPhone before you have any upgrades done on the hardware of your device, as you'll need to clear the device. You will also want to turn off Find my iPhone. To clear the device, go to Settings > General > Reset > Erase all Content and Settings. 

5. Get a battery pack.

Just in case, you guys. A dead phone is a sad phone. 

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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