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Samsung has been creating a virtual reality device in collaboration with Oculus VR for sometime. The headset is being called "GearVR" and this morning, Sammobile received the exclusive details on how it will look (pictured above) and how it will work. 

Unlike a traditional standalone headset, Gear VR is designed to dock an existing Galaxy device, explaining the lack of a screen we see in this leaked image. The device is docked using USB 3.0. Then, the virtual reality effect is created by tracking head movements with sensors. The Galaxy device is equipped with an accelerometer, gyroscope, and processing power to track the head's movements.

On the right side of Gear VR is a see-through button. This allows the Galaxy device's rear facing camera sensor to operate. That camera provides the wearer with a video feed of the outside world (if they aren't so inclined to take off the headset and see it for themselves.) Directly below this button is a touchpad, which allows for navigation of the Galaxy device. 

Samsung created the hardware for the device on their own, but the software is being developed with the help of Oculus VR (the team behind Oculus Rift.) Samsung will be creating Samsung Apps specifically for Gear VR. When the product is fully announced, we can expect Gear VR's software development kit to be fully available for developers right away, as they will want to add more apps as quickly as possible.

Because the screen is not built into the device, Sammobile believes this could substantially cut manufacturing costs, leading to a lower retail price. On the other hand, Samsung is not known for being the least expensive on the market.

As for the fit of the headset, the Gear VR looks pretty comfy (for a giant head covering) because of the elastic headband and padded cushions on either side. 

For everything we don't know, we will have to wait till September for the IFA tech show in Berlin. 

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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