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@HiddenCash has been around for about two weeks, providing San Francisco and Los Angeles with a cash prize, Twitter-based scavenger hunt. But the Internet can't leave anything good alone, so a witch hunt doxxing is already underway. 

Inside Edition decided that Internet strangers shouldn't have any fun, ever, and decided to go about finding the identity of @HiddenCash on Thursday. They didn't specify their tactics, but they were able to get the man they think is behind the account on the phone. His name is Jason Buzi and he is a real estate investor, which matches his original description, who made millions flipping houses in the Bay Area. 

Jim Moret says he spoke with the man behind @HiddenCash on the phone, the interview as follows:

"Mr. Hidden Cash, hi this is Jim Moret from Inside Edition. How are you?"

"I'm good. How are you?"

"Are you Jason Buzi?"

"No." 

"You've identified yourself as a real estate developer in San Francisco. It sounds like the same person."

"No, it is not. Several names have been bounced around in the press. None of those names are correct. None of them are me."

But Moret thinks @HiddenCash wasn't being so truthful, based on the voice. The show compared his voice to a podcast Buzi recorded, and felt they are the same. 

Buzi is a reasonable candidate for the role: he matches the description of @HiddenCash and has a history of conducting cash scavenger hunts. In 2008, he ran the website www.cashtomato.com. It also doled out cash, but when things got too hectic, police in San Francisco and NYC asked him to shut down the operation. 

Whoever Inside Edition spoke to on the phone, they do seem to have good intentions: "We definitely want to expand it and do it in more places on a bigger level, and make it sort of a nationwide or even global movement."

So, let's just leave @HiddenCash alone. Who couldn't use an extra couple bucks? 

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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