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Yesterday's WWDC presentation means that some great new software is coming to Apple products over the next few months, likely this fall. While there wasn't any new hardware announced with iOS 8 and OS X, Apple stores were overrun with super fans looking to get their hands on the new operating systems as quickly as possible.

Some tipsters with insider knowledge of Apple's retail stores told The Wire that all the news coming out of Appleland makes WWDC a rough day to be a retail employee. 

Apple employees don't have any knowledge of what's coming at WWDC in advance. Yet, in the days before the presentation, they usually get hit up for insider info by journalists, Apple super fans, and even people looking to make some quick stock trades. One staffer told us that they have actually given people bad information if they don't believe don't have insider knowledge. A tipster told us they gave a pushy Apple fan an elaborate description of an imaginary iPhone 7.

As for the actual WWDC, Apple Store employees are not forced to watch the presentation, but it is certainly encouraged, because it will aid in the giant flood of questions they receive in the days and weeks after. The conference usually streams live in breakrooms and if employees aren't on break at the time, they might have it streaming on their mobile device. 

The major frustration comes in the days after WWDC. Retail employees are hit with thousands of requests to purchase WWDC products (or in this year's case, software) after the conference, even though many are weeks or months away from their official release. Unlike past years, Apple announced a public beta program for OS X Yosemite, so hopefully that will help deter some Apple super fans from trying to convince staffers to sell products that haven't shipped yet. 

So, if you make a Genius Bar appointment in the next few days, bring your Genius a cookie and greet them with a smile. They've had a rough week and it only just started.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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