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After two days of intense Internet criticism, Good Part of Town — the start-up formerly known as Ghetto Tracker before the company realized the name wasn't "serious" enough — has shut down. The URL now leads to a blank page with the following message:

 

Of the many offensive aspects of the website that we won't miss — its name, that picture of a white family avoiding the "ghetto" — it didn't fulfill its stated purpose. For example, as of yesterday's Pando Daily write-up, the site suggested that Park Slope fell into "ghetto" territory. That's the same Park Slope featured in numerous New York Times trend stories about yuppies and their children. Houses there list for an average selling price of over $1.3 million dollars, according to real estate site Trulia. For people looking to avoid "danger," Park Slope is totally fine. The site, however, doesn't know that because instead of basing its rating system on crime statistics, it "allows locals and people familiar with area rate which parts of town are safe and which ones are unsafe." If Good Part of Town did include that kind of publicly available information, it would have noted that Park Slope has a very low crime rate.

Rather, the site — like many en vogue start-ups — relied on the voice of the crowd, which can include internal biases and inaccurate information. To prove that major flaw, trolls had marked some decidedly safe New York landmarks as "unsafe," including the Goldman Sachs headquarter and Gawker, which ran a lengthy story lambasting the site:

So, yeah, excuse us while we're not sorry to see this one go.  

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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