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On a chart designed by self-described "multidisciplinary artist" Bård Edlund, the time of day when the most people will be awake to read your pithy tweet (at least on the East Coast) is at 9 a.m. Edlund's "Is The Internet Awake?" -- which follows past projects like "The Weather Wheel" and "The Dow Piano" -- is a moving chart that has white globes -- representing 25 of the largest broadband Internet markets globally, from China's 117 million to Romania's 3 million -- oscillate from left (day) to right (night) as a 24-hour clock at the top ticks away. As you can see below, every single country Edlund tracked is on the awake side at 9 a.m. Eastern Standard Time. The further to the right a country is corresponds to the portion of its population that is likely to be asleep that hour. Edland offers a caveat, though: "this doesn't take into account how likely it is that everyone is tuned into the Internet at that time." The full, moving chart, can be found here.

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