At their main trade show GEOINT this week, the intelligence community talked a lot about making progress in preventing the next Bradley Manning from leaking government secrets. Keeping a tight grip on sensitive information has proved to be a challenge for spies in a technological age that celebrates the free flow of data, but Mike Rogers, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, thinks they're making progress. "The trick is, can we allow robust sharing for analytical and operational purposes and protect the information at the same time?" Rogers told Eli Lake at The Daily Beast. "I argue yes, there are lots of ways to do it."

The preferred method is a type of auditing software that makes it easier to spy on the spies. Lake reports that a program called SureView is gaining popularity within the nation's 16 intelligence agencies because it specializes in "behavior-based internal monitoring." In other words, SureView is designed to catch whistleblowers early in the act.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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