murelsharpe.jpg


SAVANNAH -- When you're used to big-city connectivity, the spottiness of road bandwidth can drive a reporter nuts. There you are, barreling along on I-85, trying to upload some audio, and you realize you don't have access to a cellular data network. Or you do, then you don't, then you do, then you don't.

StartupNationbug.pngSo, fresh off the often-rural drive through South Carolina from Durham to Savannah, I was open to Murel Sharpe's pitch for her company Evoca. The service sends any voice recording to the cloud. You dial a number, record your message, and Evoca stores an MP3 of the audio on the Internet. Evoca has lots of competitors (including two I've used, Audioboo and Soundcloud), but I really like the way they tie the all-over cellular voice networks into the Internet. They put the bandwidth burden on themselves, which is mighty useful when the pipe you've got is small.


We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.