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Today is the 42nd anniversary of Apollo 11, the first moon landing. It's not exactly a landmark anniversary, and NASA is a little preoccupied with wrapping up the space shuttle program, so you may not have seen the barrage of coverage that marked, say, the 40th anniversary in 2009. But it hasn't been entirely forgotten. Wired has a gallery of some of the amazing things astronauts did to train for the mission, including jungle survival and various forms of gravity training. And over at the National Archives' Tumblr Today's Document, they've unearthed the original flight plan for the mission. The relatively crude, ink-on-paper plans remind us of the computing power that has grown exponentially to support things like space flight and commercial air travel (hat tip to NPR Tumblr for the find).

The flight plan for Apollo 11 was a minute-by-minute time line of activities for the mission crew—Neil Armstrong, Mike Collins, and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin—and Mission Control in Houston. The flight was launched July 16, 1969. Touchdown on the moon took place, as scheduled, on July 20, 102 hours, 47 minutes, and 11 seconds after launch from Cape Kennedy. The astronauts spent 21 hours and 36 minutes on the moon, and returned to Earth on July 24.

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