For five years running now TechCrunch has invited startups from around the world to showcase their products during a three-day competition called TechCrunch Disrupt. It was here that Qwiki, Soluto and a number of other companies that you may have heard about were first introduced to the larger public and received attention from interested investors. The winners received $50,000 in cash. Has that money -- and the TechCrunch stage -- helped them to get off the ground? Namesake put together this infographic, which looks at how some of the Disrupt winners and losers from years past are now performing.

Infographics are always a bit of a hodgepodge of statistics culled from a variety of sources. Here, we sort through the clutter and pull out some of our favorite facts and figures:

  • Mint.com, the TechCrunch Disrupt winner in 2007, was acquired for $170 million by Intuit in 2009. The Web-based personal finance tracking application currently has more than five million users and investments from some of the biggest players in Silicon Valley, including Ron Conway and Dave McClure.
  • Often called the Twitter for business, Yammer, which won the competition in 2008, is now used by four out of five of the Fortune 500 companies and more than 100,000 businesses around the world. Yammer has raised $40 million in funding from Goldcrest Ventures, Charles River Ventures and others.
  • In 2010, Qwiki won the new San Francisco-based version of the competition (Soluto won in New York City). It has since raised more than $10 million in funding, which includes investments from Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin and YouTube co-founder Jawed Karim.

Check out more Infographics on the Technology Channel.

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