The popular David Bowie single "Golden Years" will soon find new life -- as an iPhone application. First released in November 1975, the song reached number 10 on the domestic charts after Bowie got drunk and performed it live on Soul Train. At the time, Bowie was one of the few white artists to appear on the show. After it peaked in popularity here, "Golden Years" climbed to number 8 in the U.K. Hoping to capitalize on the song's success, more than a dozen professional artists covered "Golden Years." And now, 36 years later, aspiring musicians and karaoke aficionados the world over will be able to make their own versions.

The application, which is scheduled to debut on June 6, will break "Golden Years" down into its most basic parts. It "will feature eight stem files: Bowie's lead vocal, 12-string guitar, bass, drums, guitar, harmonium, percussion (including blocks, congas, claps) and backing vocals," according to Music Radar. Using those files, app customers (£1.23) will be able to create remixes of the song.

Timed to coincide with the debut of the iPhone application, "Golden Years" will be re-released as an EP available as a CD, 12-inch or digital download. The new EP will include the original song version as well as four new remixes created by DJs Anthony Valadez, Jeremy Sole, Chris Douridas and Eric J. Lawrence. "EMI claims that each remix was heard by Bowie himself -- though it is not known whether he liked them," the Guardian reported.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.