Grist's Chris Mims points out an important datapoint in the great energy debates: developed world energy consumption has essentially stalled in the last 15 years. In fact, we use less energy than we did in the mid-'90s. The bit of context to add is that this is basically the opposite of what utility executives and government committees projected was going to happen for almost all of the 20th century.

Of course, billions of people in the developing world's people still have little access to energy and will be scratching and clawing to get more of it just as the developed nations did before them. Though perhaps they'll see the wisdom in not going down the very energy-intensive route that Americans have.

Per capita, the developed world is using less energy per person than it did in 1995, reports the National Journal. Yet taken as a whole, the world uses more energy per capita than it did 20 years ago. How is this possible? Zillions of desperately poor people were born into the world since then, and all of them have slowly gained access to a bit more energy.

Read the full story at Grist.

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