In an interactive advertisement entitled "Blood sticks to every genuine fur" just released by the Association Against Animal Factories (VGT), the iPad bleeds. The disturbing ad, made for a fur dealer, appears in the iPad edition of DATUM, an Australian monthly magazine once named the "best news magazine" by Tyler Brule, editor of Monocle and a columnist for the Financial Times.

While scrolling through the magazine -- a finger swipe advances one full-page to the next as in most digital newsproducts -- the user comes upon the advertisement. Full-page, four-color and showcasing a beautiful woman draped in a fur coat, the ad is about as enticing as any magazine ad can be. But the viewer will look at this one a lot longer than they would like. "The user, with a typical iPad 'wipe movement,' tries to remove the ad and carry on to the next page," VGT explains in a video demonstration. "But it doesn't work. Instead, every wipe leaves blood traces on the fur. And the more wipes the user tries, the more blood appears."

After enough swipes, a message appears on the screen: "27 foxes had to die in agony for this fur coat," it reads. And the user can eventually move to the next page.

"Perhaps the iPad as is less disturbing than the reality of inhumane fur processing practices," notes the Huffington Post's Joanna Zelman after presenting some information from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animal (PETA). PETA "reports that animals ranging from dogs and cats to seals and bears are killed in inhumane ways so that their fur can be used for profit. Undercover investigations reveal that some animals are bludgeoned, then hung up by their legs or tails for skinning."

While the video demonstration of the advertisement has been watched a few thousands times on YouTube at the time of this writing, only one person has disliked it using the site's rating feature. Is the support an endorsement of animal rights and VGT's message or a vote for progressive media technology?

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