When demonstrations broke out in the streets of Egypt more than a week ago, newspapers and magazines scrambled to find a way to get original content coming in from a faraway country where the government had cut all access to the Internet. Stringers were sent out and satellite phones, a technology that has been used for decades now, deployed. Some of the video captured was so compelling that it appeared at or near the top of the New York Times' homepage for at least three days in a row, a feat celebrated by Ann Derry, the editorial director for video and television at the paper, in a recent interview.

The Times hopes to continue bringing in strong video, from the ongoing demonstrations in the Middle East and elsewhere. To do this, Derry and her team are equipping reporters with Apple's iPhone 4, a device that she calls a "huge game-changer" in the video seen below.

"The other thing that's new is that we're starting to send people out with the iPhone 4. We've got Andrew Ross Sorkin in Davos, or had him in Davos, shooting video with the iPhone 4 and then with the click of ... an app, literally uploading it to our servers and we can download it. And I see that as being a huge game-changer for us because it means we can have correspondents and photographers out very quickly getting video to us."

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