In a piece for the Telegraph, Milo Yiannopoulos makes the case for why Quora, a question-and-answer site, will eventually grow to be larger than Twitter, at least in influence. The site is just getting started, but many users have noticed impressive growth over the past couple of weeks.

The most interesting thing about Quora so far has been the extent to which people - even those in senior positions in public companies - are willing to share detailed information. AOL's former chairman Steve Case has been answering questions like crazy about the company's history, while numerous start-up chief executives are sharing tips, advice and even bits of gossip. We should expect the focus of the site to shift dramatically with an influx of non-techie users, but I'd say keep a close eye on those early adopters and influencers. (The tech blogs are there already, it seems: TechCrunch has been criticised for having its agenda dictated by the hottest topics on Quora.)

Twitter was fun for the few, but Quora will be useful to the many. It's is the place to go for on-demand answers to specific questions from people who know what they're talking about. That's something no search engine - or existing social network - comes close to. Monetisation strategies present themselves readily, where they did not - and still do not - in the microblogging platform's case.

Read the full story at the Telegraph.

 

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