So, you want to learn how to be an Internet detective, huh, kid? You could do worse than starting with Charles Arthur's attempt to ascertain the identity of the person who hacked Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook page. His step-by-step account of his investigation is a model for this kind of thing. It might not be as fun as staking out a house in a beat up Lincoln, but this is sleuthing for our times.

In other words: this might be someone in the military. Most likely those edits don't come from one person - they come from all sorts of people in the Williamsburg location. Or, just as possible, it was someone who had hacked into the computers there from outside (not as difficult as you'd hope it would be) and is using them as a proxy to make the Wikipedia edit, and, quite possibly, hack Zuckerberg's page. (We've asked Facebook whether Zuckerberg's page was accessed from that IP, but haven't had an answer yet.)

Read the full story at Guardian (UK).

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