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All across the country, mobile phone enthusiasts are celebrating V-Day, the day Verizon executives announced the availability of the iPhone on their network. The good word entered the ears of America's blogging elite at 11 a.m. today at New York's Lincoln Center."If the press writes about something long enough and hard enough, eventually it comes true," Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam said. The announcement followed a flurry of questions from reporters about the exulted device's specifications: What will it offer, how much will it cost? For all that (and more!) here are some informative bullet points:


  • Pricing and Availability  "The product will be available through Verizon starting Feb. 10, though existing VZW customers will be able to place pre-orders starting Feb. 3," writes Charles Cooper at CBS News. "Prices will be $199 for a 16GB unit and $299 for a 32GB unit with a two-year contract That's about what AT&T subscribers pay."
  • It's Got Wi-Fi Hotspot Capabilities! rejoices Rosa Golijan at Gizmodo: "This means that the device will be able to act as a hotspot for up to five gadgets. It sounds like you'll activate the hotspot feature using an app which will be included on the Verizon devices."
  • This Will Be Familiar to AT&T Customers, writes Jacqui Cheng at Ars Technica. "The phone being offered by Verizon is the same as the iPhone 4 that made its debut on AT&T in the summer of 2010, but with a slightly modified antenna and apparently no SIM slot."
  • It's Gonna Cost You to Leave AT&T  "If you got an iPhone 4 for the holidays during the first week of December, it'll cost you $315 to get rid of it and switch to Verizon," writes Mark Millan at CNN. "But if you stood in line with the thousands of Apple fans on launch day in June, you can buy out of your contract for $265. Still rocking an iPhone 3GS from summer 2009? Canceling that contract could cost $85. Why the big discrepancy? AT&T raised the cost of ditching a smartphone contract in June last year. Before then, it cost $175, prorated by $5 for each month completed."
  • Here's One Drawback, notes Casey Newton at The San Francisco Chronicle: "It does not allow users to access the Internet during a phone call. AT&T customers can check their e-mail or use other data services while they're still on the phone."
  • Why Isn't It 4G?  "According to Apple COO Tim Cook, 4G wasn’t offered because it would have meant too much of a redesign. No LTE because Verizon wanted to take advantage of its 3G network," explains Adrian Kingsley-Hughes at ZDNet.
  • The Big Unknown  Neither company released details about the phone's data plans for pricing

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