Wall Street analyst Rich Greenfield put together a short YouTube video that explains how you can steal just about any movie you would ever want using a handful of sites and cloud-based storage lockers on the Internet. Greenfield, who has been described as "always outspoken," is trying to make a point: It's time for big media companies to make mainstream content as easy to legally access as is possible or they will turn elsewhere.

Greenfield's larger point is that the rise of Internet-connected TVs -- look around this year's Consumer Electronics Show, and you'll realize that the next set you buy will almost certainly have a Web connection, whether you want it or not -- and cheap bandwidth is going to create a giant headache for big media.

Big media and technology companies can try to fight it with legal and mechanical tactics, or half-steps like UltraViolet, the "everybody but Apple" coalition. But the best long-term answer is to make media consumption incredibly cheap, and incredibly easy, so that it's more convenient for mainstream users to get it legally than to go through the pirate sites.

That's an incredibly hard thing to do, because it involves trading big, existing revenue streams for smaller ones down the line. But not doing it can be even more costly: Ask the music labels.

Read the full story at All Things Digital.

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