Almost two-thirds of Internet users have paid for online content in some form, according to a survey released by Pew this morning. Between October 28 and November 1, Pew asked 755 Internet users whether or not they had purchased any of 15 different types of online material. Sixty-five percent had. They found that most users spend about $10 per month, but the average for those who paid to download or access content was about $47 per month, with most users paying for subscription services over individual file downloads or access to streaming content.

The survey results, broken down:

  • 33% of Internet users have paid for digital music online
  • 33% have paid for software
  • 21% have paid for apps for their cell phones or tablet computers
  • 19% have paid for digital games
  • 18% have paid for digital newspaper, magazine, or journal articles or reports
  • 16% have paid for videos, movies, or TV shows
  • 15% have paid for ringtones
  • 12% have paid for digital photos
  • 11% have paid for members-only premium content from a website that has other free material on it
  • 10% have paid for e-books
  • 7% have paid for podcasts
  • 5% have paid for tools or materials to use in video or computer games
  • 5% have paid for "cheats or codes" to help them in video games
  • 5% have paid to access particular websites such as online dating sites or services
  • 2% have paid for adult content

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Download the full report here (PDF).

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