We noted on these pages earlier this week that Aol had purchased TechCrunch. TechCrunch has an audience that most blogs would be envious of: sizable, yes, but also engaged, smart. Still, it doesn't compare to the size of Aol's audience, which is somewhere between massive and gargantuan. Big media companies have figured out -- for the most part -- how to organize content and build out blog networks. What is the point, today, of maintaining your own personal blog? That's the question David Armano, a senior vice president at Edelman Digital, asked this evening in a rather romantic post on his own, you guessed it, blog.

Some things come full circle. In many ways, the chickens of the blogoshphere have come home to roost.

But that's if you consider yourself a blogger. I don't. I write. I'd write if nobody was reading. I'd write on paper bags with a piece of charcoal if technology didn't exist. Most times, I write for myself. The difference between the cyclical trends in media etc. and what drives some people to produce and others to consume is less dependent on what's fashionable in the moment and more dependent on what drives you as a human being. We're all wired with a certain disposition. Sometimes advances in technology amplify that, but they rarely are the root cause.

So, readers out there who still actively maintain their own blogs: What do you get out of it? Why do you do it?

Read the full story at Logic+Emotion.

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