Pearce Delphin (@zzap), a 17-year-old from Australia, claims that, by tweeting a chunk of code, he accidentally triggered the chain of events that led to Twitter's meltdown yesterday, when thousands of users visiting Twitter.com were redirected to websites of the not-safe-for-work variety. The code, complete with a JavaScript function known as onMouseOver, automatically opened pop-ups when users just waved their cursor over the message.

"I did it merely to see if it could be done ... that JavaScript really could be executed within a tweet. At the time of posting the tweet, I had no idea it was going to take off how it did. I just hadn't even considered it," Delphin told AFP via email.

"I discovered a vulnerability, I didn't create a self-replicating worm. As far as I know, that isn't technically illegal," Delphin said. He hopes he won't get into trouble, but he very well could - the proper course of action in situations like these is reporting such a vulnerability to Twitter. Exposing a security flaw like he did, even inadvertently, is at the very least an error in judgment.

Read the full story at Mashable.

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