Three months ago, when my wife and I came across Suntime wine on its home turf -- in Urumqi / Wulumuqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region that occupies a huge swath of China's northwest -- we thought it was pretty good.

Maybe it was the power of local suggestion: We liked Xinjiang, and we liked Xinjiang's grapes. Our apartment shelves still groan with the huge sacks of Xinjiang raisins we brought back from the trip. (I'm eating some now.) Why not like the Xinjiang wine made from those grapes? Why not think fondly of the Taste of Urumqi? So we did.

While it might have been here all along, to me it's news that huge crates of Suntime Cabernet are on sale in the Beijing Carrefour, at 55RMB (about $7.30) a bottle. (Update: It's actually 48 RMB, a little under $6.50) It still seems pretty good.

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So if you come across Suntime -- on its home territory, in greater China, or abroad -- give it a chance. And by the way: Suntime's website is only in Chinese, but even if you can't understand any of it, it's actually quite interesting as its own little taste of the Silk Road/Uighur culture of the Xinjiang U.A.R. Oddly enough, one part of the site has a tab in the upper right corner that says "English version" in Chinese (英文版 -- sort of the same idea as those airplane safety cards that say, "If you can't read these instructions, please contact the flight attendant") but I've never gotten that page to load.

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