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Nationwide, black Americans live three years less than white Americans. In places with a history of segregation, that life-expectancy gap can be as much as twenty years. Staff writer Olga Khazan joins Matt Thompson, Alex Wagner, and Vann Newkirk to share the story of Kiarra Boulware, a young black woman from Baltimore whose struggles shed a light on how people living only a few miles apart have such disparate health prospects

Links

- “Being Black in America Can Be Hazardous to Your Health” (Olga Khazan, July/August 2018 Issue
- “The 'Horrifying' Consequence of Lead Poisoning” (Olga Khazan, November 8, 2017)
- “The Lead-Poisoned Generation in New Orleans” (Vann R. Newkirk II, May 21, 2017)
- “How Income Affects the Brain” (Olga Khazan, May 15, 2018)
- “The Obesity Cure Is Out of Reach in the Heaviest States” (Olga Khazan, May 7, 2018)
- “Trump's EPA Concludes Environmental Racism Is Real” (Vann R. Newkirk II, February 28, 2018)
- “Food Swamps Are the New Food Deserts” (Olga Khazan, December 28, 2017)
- “What the 'Crack Baby' Panic Reveals About The Opioid Epidemic” (Vann R. Newkirk II, July 16, 2017)
- “The Fight for Health Care Has Always Been About Civil Rights” (Vann R. Newkirk II, June 27, 2017)
- “VIDEO: Environmental Racism Is the New Jim Crow” (Vann R. Newkirk II, June 5, 2017)
- “When You Can't Afford Sleep” (Olga Khazan, September 15, 2014)

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