-- The Christian Science Monitor looks at the global trend toward megacities. Elsewhere, Dan Steinbock explores whether booming Shanghai or Hong Kong is going to emerge as China's first city.

-- Broken Sidewalks laments the destruction of Fourth Street in Louisville. (Via Urbanophile)

-- After a few paragraphs of throat-clearing, Harry Morroz gets to the persuasive part of his argument: "Most major areas of federal policy favor non-urban areas." He offers numerous examples. His mistake is attributing these imbalances to prejudiced attitudes about cities, when in fact the institutional structure of federal, state and local governments gives rural areas and suburbs disproportionate power relative to their populations, and the concentration of poor people in cities mean that a large part of urban populations wield relatively little political influence.

-- The Wall Street Journal reports: "Mayor Dave Bing has pledged to knock down 10,000 structures in his first term as part of a nascent plan to 'right-size' Detroit, or reconfigure the city to reflect its shrinking population." Incredibly, the city will have 90,000 abandoned houses and residential lots even after those 10K structures are gone. 

-- Starting in 2011, the organization that administers the Internet will start issuing city-based domain names like dot nyc, dot paris and dot london. 

-- Even small patches of forest in urban areas can help sustain species of migratory birds, Jeff McMahon writes at True/Slant.