The past four years have been among the most turbulent in U.S. history—and would have been so even without a global pandemic and waves of nationwide protest against police violence. How did we get here?

Today The Atlantic and Simon & Schuster release The American Crisis, an urgent look at a country in chaos, drawn from the pathbreaking recent work of The Atlantic’s journalists.

The American Crisis is a riveting, narrated collection that explores the factors that led us to the present moment: racial division, economic inequality, political dysfunction, the devaluation of truth, and the unique challenge posed by the president. Today’s emergencies expose pathologies years in the making. Ultimately, the collection undertakes a damage assessment: what we’ve already lost, and what we still may lose.

Curated by editor at large Cullen Murphy, the book is anchored by new essays from editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and staff writer Anne Applebaum. It includes work by more than three dozen Atlantic staff writers and contributors, including Danielle Allen, Yoni Appelbaum, Ta-Nehisi Coates, McKay Coppins, James Fallows, Caitlin Flanagan, Franklin Foer, David Frum, David A. Graham, Emma Green, Megan Garber, Ibram X. Kendi, Olga Khazan, Adrienne LaFrance, Annie Lowrey, Vann R. Newkirk II, Elaina Plott, Adam Serwer, Clint Smith, and Ed Yong.

As Goldberg writes in his introduction: “The story is larger than Donald Trump, and not simply because a grifter is actually powerless without an audience ready to be grifted. America has become unmoored from truths formerly self-evident—from the animating ideas of its creation, as articulated in our country’s founding documents.”

New subscribers may receive a book with an annual subscription to The Atlantic, and are invited to a book discussion during next week’s Atlantic Festival, on September 23 from 10-11AM, with Jeffrey Goldberg, Adrienne LaFrance, Cullen Murphy, and Adam Serwer.

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