Andrew Ferguson will join The Atlantic’s Ideas section as a staff writer, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. His essays, reporting, and reviews will appear at TheAtlantic.com and in the print magazine. Ferguson, who was most recently a national correspondent at The Weekly Standard, will begin with The Atlantic in April.

This week, The Atlantic also welcomed Dante Ramos as a senior editor for Ideas.

In a note to staff announcing Ferguson’s hire, Goldberg wrote: “Those of you who are familiar with Andy’s work know that he is one of America’s great essayists and stylists. … Andy will be a valuable addition to our Ideas team, which grew just this week with the arrival of the section's third editor, Dante Ramos.”  

Ferguson joined The Weekly Standard as a senior editor when it was launched in 1995, and remained affiliated with the outlet until it closed late last year. He is the author of three books: Fools’ Names, Fools’ Faces; Land of Lincoln; and Crazy U: One Dad’s Crash Course on Getting His Kid into College. Prior to joining The Weekly Standard, Ferguson was a staff writer for Scripps Howard News Service and a senior writer for Washingtonian magazine. Earlier in his career, he was an assistant managing editor at the American Spectator, and, in 1992, he served as a speechwriter for President George H. W. Bush.

Ramos comes to The Atlantic from the Boston Globe, where he led the Ideas section and before that served as deputy editor of the paper's editorial page. In 2014, he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He previously served as the deputy editorial page editor of The New Orleans Times-Picayune.

The Atlantic’s Ideas section debuted in September 2018 as a destination for sharp analysis, essays, and commentary that provides insight into the key issues of the day and drives the public conversation. The section is led by Yoni Appelbaum, with deputy editor Juliet Lapidos.

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