The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg promoted two editors to the top of the magazine’s masthead: naming longtime deputy editor Don Peck as the top print editor, and Denise Wills, currently features editor, stepping into the role of deputy editor for the magazine. The promotions are effective immediately.

In a memo to The Atlantic’s staff, Goldberg writes: “I am confident that Don and Denise will be conscientious stewards of The Atlantic, which is one of American journalism’s greatest treasures. I am also confident that they will engage in a process of continuous creation, innovation, and useful provocation. The magazine is the historical and spiritual core of our great journalism institution, and its health and vitality are of paramount importance to us all.”

Peck first joined The Atlantic in 2001 as a researcher and later a junior editor. As the magazine’s deputy editor since 2013 and most recently as acting editor, Peck has shepherded scores of features and cover stories at The Atlantic, notably this year’s “The 9.9% is The New Aristocracy,” as well as “The Mind of Donald Trump,” “The End of Men,” “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” and the most-read Atlantic story of all time, “What ISIS Really Wants.” Peck succeeds Scott Stossel, who has moved into a role as national editor for the magazine—where he will continue to edit, recruit writers to The Atlantic, and return to writing himself.

As features editor for the past year, Wills launched and led a cross-platform initiative to boost some of The Atlantic’s most ambitious digital-only pieces of journalism. She joined The Atlantic four years ago from Politico magazine and before that was an editor at Washingtonian. Last year, two stories she edited—Caitlin Flanagan’s “Death at a Penn State Fraternity,” and the late Alex Tizon’s memoir of his family secret, “My Family’s Slave”—became National Magazine Award finalists, and Tizon’s piece took the award.

This fall, The Atlantic has published a string of highly-influential cover stories: “How ICE Went Rogue,” investigating America’s immigration crisis; a special issue, “Is Democracy Dying?,” probing the crisis of the American system of government and whether it’s possible to repair the damage; and “Alexa, How Will You Change Us?,” examining the way smart speakers are revolutionizing human habits.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.