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Donald Trump wasn’t the only election surprise of 2016. Three months before he won the presidency, the United Kingdom shocked observers by voting to leave the European Union. Ever since, Brexit has dominated British politics.

But while Americans may have to wait another 11 months to see Trump’s name back on the ballot, British elections arrive much faster (and of late, much more frequently). Britain may not be terribly enthusiastic about heading back to the polls, but the stakes couldn’t be higher. Will the U.K. have another referendum? Will it endorse a “hard” Brexit? And how are British voters actually making up their mind?

The staff writer Helen Lewis joins Edward-Isaac Dovere from London to preview the election.

Listen for:

  • Why Brexit may not be the deciding factor in this election (and what could be)

  • How a terror attack on London Bridge and a scandal in the royal family have affected British politics

  • What lingering accusations of bigotry mean for major-party leaders

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