Evan Vucci / AP

Written by Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey).


Today in 5 Lines

  • The search continues for a replacement for White House Chief of Staff John Kelly after several leading candidates reportedly have already declined the role.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a case brought by two states—Kansas and Louisiana—that were seeking to end Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood.

  • Maria Butina, the accused Russian spy who was close with officials at the National Rifle Association, seems to have reached a plea deal with the Justice Department, according to a new court filing.

  • Hundreds of activists protested in the offices of three House Democratic leaders, including likely incoming Speaker Nancy Pelosi. The protesters are encouraging Democrats to create a special committee focused on climate change.

  • Over the weekend, House Democrats discussed the prospect of impeachment, and one senator suggested that Trump’s troubles have entered a “new phase.”


Today on The Atlantic


Snapshot

Josie, an English retriever, plays in the snow as her owners, Dawn and Mark Lundblad, walk along Sandy Cove Drive on Sunday in Morganton, North Carolina. More than a foot of snow fell in the area over the weekend. (Kathy Kmonicek / AP)

What We’re Reading

In Case You Missed It: These are five big takeaways from federal prosecutors’ filings on Friday in three cases involving Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen. (Aaron Blake, The Washington Post)

Paul Ryan’s Great Betrayal: As the current House Speaker prepares to leave office, it has become clear that he “proved as much a practitioner of post-truth politics as Donald Trump,” argues Ezra Klein. (Vox)

29 Minutes With Sherrod Brown: Some Democrats think that the Ohio senator, with his Midwest pragmatism and populist reputation, would be a perfect challenger for Donald Trump. Brown, though, is still getting used to the attention. (Gabriel Debenedetti, New York)


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