President Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Wisconsin.Mike Roemer / AP

Written by Madeleine Carlisle (@maddiecarlisle2) and Olivia Paschal (@oliviacpaschal)


Today in 5 Lines

  • Authorities arrested Cesar Sayoc of Florida in connection with several explosive devices mailed this week to high-profile critics of President Donald Trump. Officials discovered three more bombs, intended for Senator Cory Booker, Senator Kamala Harris, and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

  • Speaking at the Young Black Leadership Summit, a gathering of black conservatives, Trump called the bombs “terrorizing acts.” In a tweet earlier in the day, he blamed “this ‘Bomb’ stuff” for slowing Republicans’ midterm momentum.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis reportedly approved the Department of Homeland Security’s request to send additional troops to the U.S.-Mexico border in anticipation of the arrival of a caravan of Central American immigrants.

  • President Trump will hold a rally tonight in Charlotte, North Carolina, starting at 7:30 p.m. ET. On Saturday he will campaign in Murphysboro, Illinois, and is expected to hold at least 10 more rallies between October 31 and Election Day.

  • The Commerce Department reported that the U.S. economy expanded at a 3.5 percent rate in the third quarter of 2018, putting the economy on pace for the fastest annual growth in 13 years.


Today on The Atlantic

  • Taking on Trump: Senator Kamala Harris, often considered the Democrats’ strongest potential 2020 presidential candidate, is crisscrossing the country, previewing her message. (Edward-Isaac Dovere)

  • Defining Terrorism: There’s still no legal—or colloquial—consensus on what counts as terrorism. But if sending pipe bombs to several prominent political figures isn’t terrorism, what is? (Kathy Gilsinan)

  • George Papadopoulos’s Ask: As he faces sentencing for his guilty plea of lying to the FBI, the former Trump campaign advisor has reportedly offered to testify in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee in exchange for immunity. (Natasha Bertrand)

  • Megyn Kelly’s Half-Hearted Rebranding: When she launched her now-canceled morning show on NBC only a year ago, Megyn Kelly professed she was “done with politics for now.” But politics still exist in spaces “insistently deemed ‘politics free,’” writes Megan Garber. Here’s our 2017 profile of the former Fox News star.


Snapshot

FBI agents cover a van in Plantation, Florida, that federal agents and police officers have been examining in connection with package bombs that were sent to high-profile critics of President Donald Trump. (WPLG-TV / AP)


What We’re Reading

They Knew: In a May meeting with senior Trump administration officials, a former Department of Homeland Security advisor warned them that they were violating immigrants’ civil rights by separating children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. When they didn’t listen, Scott Shuchart writes, he quit. (The Washington Post)

Combating Voter-ID Laws: After a Supreme Court ruling disqualified thousands of Native Americans in North Dakota from voting in the upcoming election, many tribal governments have taken matters into their own hands. (Elena Saavedra Buckley, High Country News)

Mississippi Espy: If elected, Mississippi Democratic Senate candidate Mike Espy would be the first black senator from the state since the Reconstruction era. But the Democratic label is a hard sell in Mississippi. (Nicholas Fandos, The New York Times)

A Cruel War in Yemen: Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen has starved millions, and is pushing the country to the verge of a catastrophic famine. (Declan Walsh, The New York Times)


Visualized

Understanding the Pay Gap: The median salary for full-time working women is about 80 percent of men’s. For context, that’s akin to working 10 weeks a year without pay. See how your profession compares. (Xaquín G.V., The Washington Post)

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