Evan Vucci / AP

Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey), Madeleine Carlisle (@maddiecarlisle2), Olivia Paschal (@oliviacpaschal)

Today in 5 Lines

  • Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, resigned, effective at the end of the year. In a joint appearance with Haley, President Donald Trump said that he would announce her successor “within the next two to three weeks.” Read a transcript of their remarks here.

  • Hurricane Michael is expected to make landfall on the Florida Gulf Coast Thursday as a Category 3 storm, according to the National Weather Service.

  • Trump will hold a rally in Iowa, where he is slated to announce a new pro-ethanol policy that Republicans hope will curry favor with farmers. The rally begins at 6:30 p.m. CT.

  • Brett Kavanaugh heard his first cases as associate justice of the Supreme Court, including Stokeling v. United States, which addresses the definition of a violent felony, and United States v. Stitt, which debates what qualifies as a burglary.

  • Today is the last day to register to vote in 18 states, including Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Nevada (by mail), New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah (by mail).


Today on The Atlantic


Snapshot

President Trump meets with outgoing U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley in the Oval Office of the White House. Evan Vucci / AP


What We’re Reading

Be Afraid: The International Panel on Climate Change released a report over the weekend saying that climate change is happening much faster than was previously thought. Here’s what that means. (Carolyn Kormann, The New Yorker)

Where Is the Nuance?: Noah Rothman writes that although some historical figures might not meet today’s social mores, they still deserve respect. (Commentary Magazine)

It Wasn’t About Wanting It More: Republicans didn’t get Brett Kavanaugh confirmed to the Senate by being more ruthless than Democrats, writes Matthew Yglesias. They simply had the votes. (Vox)

The Alt-Right Is Still Online: Despite attempts to purge them, many white supremacists are still finding ways to gather online. (April Glaser, Slate)

The War Goes On: The U.S. military is now, for the first time, recruiting soldiers who were born after the “war on terror” began, leading to a change in PR strategy. (Vera Bergengruen, Buzzfeed News)


Visualized

Secret Money: Here’s how—and why—PACs on both the left and right are delaying the disclosure of their donors until after the midterms. (Maggie Severns, Politico, Derek Willis, ProPublica)

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