Rick Gates leaves the federal district court in Washington, D.C. on February 14.Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Written by Madeleine Carlisle (@maddiecarlisle2) and Olivia Paschal (@oliviacpaschal)


Today in 5 Lines


Today on The Atlantic

  • An Unfolding Tragedy: In The Atlantic’s September cover story, Franklin Foer investigates the radicalization of ICE under President Trump.

  • It’s Happened Before: Fifty million years ago, there were palm trees in the Arctic Circle. Peter Brannen explains the frightening precedent revealed in a recent climate change study.

  • Useful Signaling: “White-bashing,” which some have accused recent New York Times hire Sarah Jeong of, can actually serve a purpose, argues Reihan Salam.

  • Twitter Trouble: President’s Trump tweet on Sunday about the purpose of the 2016 Trump Tower meeting may have incriminated both his son and himself. (David A. Graham)


Snapshot

Democratic candidate Danny O'Connor speaks with reporters ahead of Tuesday's special election in Ohio’s 12th congressional district. (Shannon Stapleton / Reuters)

What We’re Reading

A Leftist in Michigan: Abdul El-Sayed, who’s been called “the new Obama,” is running to be Michigan’s next governor on a leftist platform. Can he win? (Nathan J. Robinson, New York Magazine)

Fighting Poverty: Activists with the Poor People’s Campaign in Kentucky have been locked out of the statehouse and snubbed by the governor—but they’re pressing on. (Junior Walters, Facing South)

‘America’s Test Market’: The demographics of Columbus, Ohio, are nearly identical to the country as a whole—making Tuesday’s special election in Ohio’s 12th congressional district a bellwether race. (John Fund, National Review)

‘Master of the Dog Whistle’: President Trump has a concerning tendency to insult the intelligence of black—and only black—athletes, writes Michael Powell. (The New York Times)


Visualized

Flooded: See how the very levees meant to stop floods can cause them instead. (Al Shaw, Lisa Song, Katie Campbell, and Ranjani Chakraborty, ProPublica)

The Word ‘Welfare’: Even as more Americans have become dependent on government assistance, public opinion has turned against it. (Emily Badger, The New York Times)

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.