Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play

This week, the most rigorous estimate yet of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria was published, marking a grim milestone: the hurricane season of 2017 was one of the deadliest in North America in a century. A year after Puerto Rico, Houston, and other communities were devastated by storms, they’re still counting the victims and trying to rebuild. Because of climate change, these types of extreme disasters may only grow more common.

In this episode, The Atlantic’s staff writers Vann Newkirk and Elaina Plott join Matt Thompson to discuss their reporting on Puerto Rico and Houston. How are they doing a year later? And what should we learn from their recovery efforts?

Links

- “A New Death Toll for Puerto Rico After Hurricane Maria” (Vann R. Newkirk II, August 28, 2018)
- “Hurricane Harvey Is Houston’s Unending Nightmare” (Elaina Plott, August 26, 2018)
- “A Look Back at Hurricane Harvey: One Year Since Landfall” (Alan Taylor, August 26, 2018)
- “Researchers Are Still Counting the Dead From Hurricane Maria” (Vann R. Newkirk II, August 2, 2018)

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.