Nati Harnik / AP

Written by Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey) and Olivia Paschal (@oliviacpaschal)


Today in 5 Lines

  • Following a meeting at the White House, President Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker announced a limited trade deal, including increased exports of American soybeans to Europe.

  • National-Security Adviser John Bolton said Trump will not meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin in the United States until next year. Russia had hedged on whether it would accept the invitation.

  • Trump lashed out at his former lawyer Michael Cohen on Twitter, after CNN aired a recording in which Trump and Cohen can be heard discussing payments to a former Playboy model.

  • A federal judge denied Trump’s attempt to dismiss a court case centered on the constitutionality of his continued business dealings with foreign governments.   

  • During his testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo assured lawmakers that Trump “has a complete and proper understanding” of Russian meddling in the 2016 election.


Today on The Atlantic

  • Failing Up: When McKay Coppins went to Sean Spicer’s launch party for his new book, The Briefing, he found a man unfazed by his critics, and a crowd willing to forgive and forget.  

  • Tape-gate: The release of a recorded conversation in which President Trump appears to discuss hush payments to a Playboy model could have serious legal ramifications, Adam Serwer reports.

  • ‘Angry, Betrayed, and Concerned’: The special-immigrant-visa program has long streamlined the immigration process for people who served alongside U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq. But under the Trump administration, the number of visas granted has dropped dramatically. (Priscilla Alvarez)

  • A Worrisome Development: If Trump makes good on his threat to revoke the security clearances of former top intelligence officials, he could set a dangerous new precedent for future administrations, writes Eliot Cohen.


Snapshot

President Trump with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in the Oval Office. Evan Vucci / AP

What We’re Reading

To Own or Not to Own: “Owning the libs” might be the tried-and-true Trumpian way, but it isn’t a winning formula for conservatism in the long term, argues Noah Rothman. (Commentary)

A Sign of the Times: While covering the annual Aspen Security Forum in Colorado, reporter Julia Ioffe met an unusually inquisitive Uber driver. Was she … a spy? (GQ)

All Eyes on Them: From Kyrsten Sinema to Kristi Noem, here are nine women candidates to watch in the 2018 midterm elections. (Vox)

More to Come: President Trump is reportedly pushing for 25 percent tariffs on $200 billion in foreign-made cars—against the advice of senior advisers and GOP leaders. (Damian Paletta, The Washington Post)


Visualized

Unequal Justice: Homicides in which the victim is black are the least likely to result in an arrest, according to a Washington Post analysis. (Wesley Lowery, Kimbriel Kelly, and Steven Rich)

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