David Zalubowski / AP

-Written by Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey)


Today in 5 Lines

  • President Trump held a “Celebration of America” event in lieu of the planned Philadelphia Eagles celebration. Less than 24 hours before their visit to the White House, Trump disinvited the Super Bowl champions for what he said was a disagreement on standing during the National Anthem.

  • Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt reportedly enlisted an aide to help his wife get a job with Chick-fil-A.

  • During her testimony before a Senate subcommittee, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said that Trump’s school-safety commission will not study the role of guns in campus violence.

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell canceled most of the body’s August recess in an effort to push through Trump’s nominees and pass government spending bills.

  • Trump is reportedly considering pardoning Alice Marie Johnson, a 63-year-old woman serving a life sentence for drug possession and money laundering. Kim Kardashian met with Trump last week to advocate for Johnson’s release.


Today on The Atlantic

  • The White House’s White Rabbit: First Lady Melania Trump’s long absence from the public eye has fueled a number of conspiracy theories from the left: “There is Trump Derangement Syndrome,” said one White House reporter, “and it’s real.” (Alex Wagner)

  • ‘Paul Manafort Loses His Cool’: Trump’s former campaign chairman is known for being level-headed. But when it comes to his own legal problems, writes Franklin Foer, “he has shown himself capable of profoundly dunderheaded miscalculations.”

  • Is This How Higher Education Dies?: A self-described education futurist explains how a dip in college enrollment could be foreshadowing a major crisis in higher education. (Adam Harris)

  • Buyer’s Remorse: President Trump has recently attempted to distance himself from his administration’s hardline immigration policies. It might be too late for that. (David A. Graham)


The Races We’re Watching

Voters in California, Iowa, Montana, New Jersey, and New Mexico are heading to the polls for their state primaries.

In California, all eyes are on Orange County, where Democrats are contesting two seats being vacated by Republican Representatives Ed Royce and Darrell Issa. Democrats are also hoping to unseat Republican incumbents Dana Rohrabacher and Mimi Walters. Complicating matters is the California’s “top-two” primary system, which could shut popular candidates out of key races.

New Jersey has several significant races, including the battle for the 7th congressional district. Here, Republican Representative Leonard Lance is hoping to hang on to his seat in a district Hillary Clinton won in 2016.

These are some of the other races you should keep an eye on.


Snapshot

A person attending President Trump's "Celebration of America" event on the South Lawn of the White House holds up a jersey of Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz. Evan Vucci / AP


What We’re Reading

‘It Was My Job, and I Didn’t Find Him’: Four months after the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Scot Peterson, the school’s former on-duty resource officer, is still grappling with his failure to stop the attack. (Eli Saslow, The Washington Post)

Their Strategy Isn’t Working: Democrats were given a massive opportunity to retake Congress when Donald Trump was elected, writes Ben Shapiro. They’re blowing it. (National Review)

What Trump Cares About Most: Instead of retaliating against the United States, America’s trade partners should work together on a package of sanctions targeting the Trump Organization, argues Matthew Yglesias. (Vox)

Trump’s Getting Away With It: The president’s ability to muddy the waters has prevented the full impact of the Trump-Russia scandal from resonating with the American people, writes David Corn. (Mother Jones)


Visualized

‘Beat Plastic Pollution’: Take a look at some of the plastic waste that has accumulated around the world—and some of the efforts to clean it up. (Alan Taylor, The Atlantic)

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