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A new generation of political activists have grown up more interested in provoking outrage from their fellow citizens than in winning them over. Among the most influential exemplars of the genre is Stephen Miller, a senior policy adviser to President Trump. What happens when the trolls run politics? What happens when they run the White House?

Links
- “Trump’s Right-Hand Troll” (McKay Coppins, May 28, 2018)
- “How an Aspiring It-Girl Tricked New York's Party People - and Its Biggest Banks” (Jessica Pressler, New York Magazine, May 28, 2018)
- “Review: 'Children of Blood and Bone,' by Tomi Adeyemi” (Vann R. Newkirk II, April 2018 Issue)
- “This Is The Daily Stormer’s Playbook” (Ashley Feinberg, Huffington Post, December 13, 2017)
- “Watch: Young Stephen Miller jokes “torture is a celebration of life”” (Noah Kulwin, Vice, May 30, 2017)
- “The Future of Trumpism Is on Campus” (Elaine Godfrey, January 2, 2018)
- “Is Free Speech Really Challenged on Campus?” (Julian E. Zelizer and Morton Keller, September 15, 2017)
- “Trolls Are Winning the Internet, Technologists Say” (Adrienne LaFrance, March 29, 2017)
- “The First Troll” (James Parker, December 2016 Issue)
- “Should We Feed the Trolls?” (Adrienne LaFrance, April 28, 2016)

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