Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

-Written by Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey)


Today in 5 Lines

  • During an address to the annual NRA convention in Dallas, Texas, President Trump assured voters that he would protect the Second Amendment, criticized the special-counsel investigation, and thanked rapper Kanye West for his support.

  • President Trump told reporters that Rudy Giuliani needed to “get his facts straight” after the former mayor said that Trump reimbursed his lawyer, Michael Cohen, for a $130,000 payment to adult-film actress Stormy Daniels. Hours later, Giuliani walked back his comments.

  • Jennifer Pena, the White House physician assigned to Vice President Mike Pence, resigned after fallout over President Trump’s doctor and former pick to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, Ronny Jackson. CNN reported earlier this week that Pena had raised concerns about Jackson’s workplace conduct last fall.

  • The Department of Homeland Security ended a program that allowed 57,000 Honduran citizens to temporarily live and work in the United States.

  • The U.S. added 164,000 jobs in April, and the unemployment rate fell to 3.9 percent.


Today on The Atlantic


Snapshot

President Trump delivers remarks at the National Rifle Association Convention in Dallas, Texas. Carlos Barria / Reuters


What We’re Reading

Armed and Black: A pregnant black woman is facing two years in prison for defending herself with a gun. Gun-rights groups are strangely silent. (Jane Coaston, Vox)

Evolution of a Muckraking Conservative: In order to finally be taken seriously and get the respect he feels he deserves, Project Veritas’s James O’Keefe seems open to moving away from partisan causes. (Tim Alberta, Politico)

From Russia With Love: President Trump reportedly surprised his own advisers in March by inviting Russian President Vladimir Putin to Washington for a meeting. Will he follow through with it? (Susan Glasser, The New Yorker)

A Letter to Trump’s Evangelical Defenders: “We are not told to rationalize and justify sinful actions to preserve political influence or a popular audience,” writes David French. Christians who do will come to regret it. (National Review)

‘A Row About Roe’: The Iowa legislature just passed the strictest abortion law in the country. Here’s what happens next. (S.M., The Economist)


Visualized

Back in Benghazi: In 2012, armed militants attacked the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, killing Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and two others. Here’s what the city looks like now. (Declan Walsh, The New York Times)

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