Michael Conroy / AP

Today in 5 Lines

Donald Trump is keeping everyone guessing about his running mate ahead of his announcement on Friday, but some media reports suggest he’ll pick Indiana Governor Mike Pence. Hillary Clinton campaigned with Virginia Senator Tim Kaine—a potential VP pick—in Annandale, Virginia. The Republican National Committee released the speakers list for the party’s national convention that while stacked with celebrities, appeared short on Republican stars; and the Republican rules committee met in Cleveland for the first time to decide the rules of the gathering. And U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said she regrets her “ill-advised” comments about Donald Trump.


Today on The Atlantic

  • ‘Is Terrorism Getting Worse?’: According to some measures, the death toll from terrorist attacks is increasing across the globe. But how do you define terrorism? And how do you separate terrorism from the context of civil wars? (Uri Friedman)

  • The GOP, Trump-ified: Heated platform committee debates are highlighting the existential crisis facing the Republican party: Will Donald Trump influence the platform’s tone forever, or will deep-rooted conservative forces prevail? (Molly Ball)

  • How to Be Less Racist: Psychologists are working to find a way to train the brain to be less prejudiced. One exercise that worked? Linking black people with positive qualities and white people with negative ones. (Olga Khazan)

The Atlantic is headed to the conventions! You can sign up for our daily convention newsletter here, or find out about our events in Cleveland or Philadelphia. And follow stories throughout the day with our Politics & Policy portal.


Snapshot

Hillary Clinton accompanied by Senator Tim Kaine, arrives to speak at a rally at Northern Virginia Community College in Annandale on Thursday. Andrew Harnik / AP


What We’re Reading

His Name Was Tamir Rice: In 2014, a 12-year-old African-American boy was killed by a police officer on a playground. No charges were filed, and the case was settled without a trial. Here’s how that happened. (Sean Flynn, GQ)

Getting Past McConnell: The process of confirming federal judges is notoriously long and arduous. But under the current Senate majority leader, only 20 district and circuit court judges have been approved—less than one-third of the judges confirmed during George W. Bush’s final two years in office. (Seung Min Kim, Politico)

The Obsession with Objectivity: While he admits that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s comments about Donald Trump didn’t reflect well on the Supreme Court, Vox’s Ezra Klein posits that her comments don’t actually interfere with her ability to judge a case fairly.

Attack at Your Own Risk: Donald Trump seems to take all criticism personally—often responding with insults, threats, and even lawsuits. How then would he function as a democratic leader? (Frances Stead Sellers, The Washington Post)

Zika Stagnation: More than 1,300 cases of the virus have been confirmed, and at least nine babies have been born with Zika-related birth defects in the United States. Still,the Senate failed to pass a funding bill to combat the virus before adjourning for their summer recess. Why? (Dylan Scott, STAT)


Visualized

Convention Takeover: The Republican and Democratic National Conventions in Cleveland and Philadelphia are fast approaching. Check out these maps designating secret service zones and protest areas. (Alicia Parlapiano and Anjali Singhvi)


Question of the Week

Pokémon Go, a phone app that lets users catch and battle the famous fictional creatures, has picked up steam since its launch last week. If Bernie Sanders was a Pokémon, what would he be called? In case you’re not a Poké-master, check out this guide to Pokémon species, for inspiration.

Send your answers to hello@theatlantic.com or tweet us @TheAtlPolitics, and our favorites will be featured in Friday’s Politics & Policy Daily.

-Written by Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey)

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