Paul Sancya / AP

What We’re Watching

The first night of the Democratic National Convention was a mixture of celebration and indignation.

A parade of powerhouse speakers took the stage in support of Hillary Clinton, starting with Minnesota Senator Al Franken and comedian Sarah Silverman, New Jersey Senator Corey Booker, and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren. Many of the speakers encouraged the party’s members to fall in line behind the party’s nominee—and all of them were met with a mixture of uproarious applause, chants, and boos from delegates on the floor. When Sanders took the stage, he acknowledged the frustrations of his supporters, but concluded with a full-throated endorsement of the party’s presumptive nominee.

It was Michelle Obama though who gave the most memorable address of the evening, one that our own Yoni Appelbaum called a masterful performance,” where she touted her confidence in America’s greatness—and called for party unity—to great applause.

And the Democratic party does indeed need to work to unify Sanders and Clinton supporters after a heated primary season. Peter Beinart writes that many white Democrats—as well as white Republicans—have lost faith in the American system. And Conor Friedersdorf spoke with anti-Hillary protesters outside the convention arena about their anger with the establishment.

Tonight, the Mothers of the Movement, a group that includes the mothers of several young black men killed by police, are scheduled to speak, as well as former President Bill Clinton. We’re covering it live right here.

Curious about what’s going on on the ground in Philadelphia? Vann Newkirk is in Philadelphia, asking convention attendees about the future of the Democratic party.

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