Scott Heppell / AP

Today in One Paragraph

Donald Trump said he will visit Scotland to attend the official opening of his golf course, a day after the U.K. votes on whether to leave the European Union. President Obama challenged Republican arguments about the economy and knocked Donald Trump, without naming him, during a speech in Indiana. Two people are dead after a shooting at the University of California, Los Angeles. And French investigators detected underwater signals from one of the flight recorders on the downed EgyptAir plane.


Top News

Trump Heads to the U.K. The presumptive Republican presidential nominee will visit the Turnberry Golf Resort on June 24, one day after the “Brexit” vote. Trump said in an interview Wednesday that he supports the “leave” campaign. (David Wright, CNN)

Obama in Indiana. The president touted the country’s economic recovery and ripped the Republican presidential nominee’s proposals without mentioning him during a speech in Elkhart, Indiana, the site of his first domestic trip as president in 2009. “The primary story that Republicans have been telling about the economy is not supported by the facts. It's just not,” Obama said. (The Chicago Tribune)

Shooting at UCLA. Two people were killed in a murder-suicide in an engineering building, the Los Angeles Police Department said. According to a law enforcement official, police believe that the deceased are a professor and a student. The motive for the shooting remains unclear. (Los Angeles Times)

Signals from MS804. French investigators said they have detected signals from one of the black boxes on board the EgyptAir plane that crashed en route from Paris to Cairo on May 19. The black box could help authorities figure out what caused the crash, but search teams have only 30 days to track the signal before the box’s batteries run out. (BBC News)

Tomorrow in One Paragraph. Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, and Donald Trump will campaign in California ahead of the state’s primary. Clinton will deliver a major national security address in San Diego.

Follow stories throughout the day with our new Politics & Policy page. And keep on top of the campaign with our 2016 Distilled election dashboard.


Top Read

“Polarization notwithstanding, it’s at least a little amazing how quickly and easily Trump—who has bucked party orthodoxy on a range of issues—consolidated the GOP vote. The fact that Republican voters are treating him as any other nominee may give him a floor on his support, ensuring he doesn’t get blown out by Clinton.” FiveThirtyEight’s Harry Enten on how Republican voters are coalescing behind Donald Trump.

Top Lines

Without a Net. Two decades after the Bill Clinton White House heralded welfare reform as its signature legislative achievement, states like Arizona demonstrate its broken promises, proving it has not helped the poor, especially children, saved meaningful amounts of money, or reduced unemployment. (Jordan Weissman, Slate)

‘The Art of the Swindle.’ Unsealed documents show that Trump University, the now-defunct education program created by the presumptive Republican nominee, had a dubious business model that targeted customers with financial fears. (Matt Ford, The Atlantic)

Email Spam. While Hillary Clinton has dealt some damage to her Republican rival, the persistent drip of news about the email server scandal—most recently the State Department inspector general’s office report—continues to distract the campaign from relaying a positive message. (Annie Karni, Politico)


Top View

America’s High Points. Many states in the Midwest and Northeast reached their peak populations between 1950 and 1970 and have been declining ever since. These charts use historical census data to illustrate the year when every county across the United States were at their most populous. (Emily Badger and Christopher Ingraham, The Washington Post)

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-Written by Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey)

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