Luiz Ribeiro / AP

Today in One Paragraph

The White House issued a directive instructing all U.S. public schools to allow transgender students to use bathrooms corresponding with their gender identity. The Washington Post accused Donald Trump of speaking with reporters in the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s under a pseudonym. The bidding in the auction of the gun George Zimmerman used to kill Trayvon Martin in 2012 reached $65 million. And President Obama hosted leaders of five Scandinavian countries at the White House.


Top News

A Sweeping Directive. The Education and Justice Departments sent a joint letter to public schools containing guidelines meant to ensure that “transgender students enjoy a supportive and nondiscriminatory school environment,” the Obama administration said on Thursday. The guidance was issued amid a debate surrounding transgender rights in North Carolina. (Emanuella Grinberg, CNN)

Texas Responds. The Texas Lieutenant Governor said the state is willing to forego federal public school funding over the Obama administration’s order that schools allow transgender students to use bathrooms matching their gender identity. “We will not be blackmailed by the president's 30 pieces of silver,”  Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick said. “The people of Texas and the Legislature will find a way to find as much of that money as we can if we are forced to.” (Paul J. Weber, Associated Press)

Trump’s Alter Ego? The Washington Post obtained a recording of a 1991 interview between a People magazine reporter and a man who claimed to be a Trump staffer named John Miller. The Post claims the publicist was actually the businessman using a fake name. Trump has admitted to using fake names like “John Barron” while talking to the press in the past, but on the Today show Friday morning, Trump denied the voice was his. (The Washington Post; Today)

A Gun Auction Hijacking? Bidding for the gun George Zimmerman used to kill Trayvon Martin reached $65 million on the gun auction website United Gun Group, after it was removed from GunBroker.com on Thursday. Bidders used names like “Racist McShootface” and “Tamir Rice,” suggesting that the auction was hijacked. (J. Weston Phippen, The Atlantic)

Nordic Leaders Visit Washington. President Obama and leaders from Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Iceland agreed on environmental protections to restrict oil and gas drilling in the Arctic during a meeting at the White House. “We will work towards the highest global standards, best international practice, and a precautionary approach, when considering new and existing commercial activities in the Arctic, including oil and gas operations,” the countries said in a joint statement. (Timothy Cama, The Hill)

The Weekend in One Paragraph. Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton will campaign in Kentucky. On Sunday, President Obama will give the commencement address at Rutgers University.

Follow stories throughout the day with our new Politics & Policy page. And keep on top of the campaign with our 2016 Distilled election dashboard.


Top Read

“The vast majority of U.S. prisoners are in state prisons, not federal, and the majority of those have been convicted of violent crimes (54 percent) as opposed to drug crimes (16 percent). To reduce the American prison population in a meaningful way, states will have to liberalize sentences and parole for some violent offenders—a terrifying prospect for politicians. In Maryland, though, the politically impossible has been happening for three years now.” HuffPost Highline’s Jason Fagone on how one inmate managed to give 230 convicted criminals a second chance at life.


Top Lines

The Hillary Doctrine. The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg spoke with The New York Times’ Mark Landler on the ideological differences between the Democratic front-runner and President Obama—and whether Clinton operates from a clear “doctrine.”

Berning Down the House. Sanders is hoping to make fundamental changes to the voting process at the Democratic National Convention this summer. One proposal? Reform the superdelegate system. (Ruby Cramer and Evan McMorris-Santoro, BuzzFeed)


Top View

When Was the Greatest Era of American Innovation? From the transcontinental railroad in 1870 to trans-Atlantic jumbo jet flights, these portraits illustrate the most transformative innovations in American history. (Neil Irwin, The New York Times)

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-Written by Elaine Godfrey (@elainejgodfrey)

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