Evan Vucci / AP

Today in One Paragraph

President Obama outlined a ban on solitary confinement for juvenile offenders in federal prison in an op-ed. Donald Trump picked up the endorsement of Jerry Falwell, Jr. Some of America’s largest companies said that they’ll provide aid to Flint, Michigan, where the water supply has been contaminated. Cleveland fired six of its police officers involved in a fatal 2012 car chase. And, overseas, the pope met with the president of Iran.


Top News

Scaling Back Solitary Confinement. In an op-ed published by The Washington Post, President Obama said that solitary confinement for juvenile offenders can lead to “devastating, lasting psychological consequences.” The new measures announced by the president also prevent corrections officers from punishing inmates who commit “low-level infractions” with solitary confinement. (Juliet Eilperin)

Falwell Backs Trump. Jerry Falwell Jr., an evangelical leader and the president of Liberty University, endorsed Donald Trump for president. Trump is “a successful executive and entrepreneur, a wonderful father and a man who I believe can lead our country to greatness again,” he said in a statement. (Eliza Collins, Politico)

Private Sector Donates to Flint. Walmart, Coca-Cola, Nestlé, and PepsiCo announced that they will deliver 6.5 million water bottles, enough for Flint’s 10,000 students, through the end of the year to help alleviate the city’s water crisis. But the donation also “represents the displacement of government by corporations.” (David Graham, The Atlantic)

Six Officers Fired in Cleveland. The Cleveland Division of Police fired Michael Brelo, along with five other officers, in connection to a high-speed chase in 2012 that ended with officers firing 137 rounds that killed two unarmed suspects, Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams. (Bill Chappell, NPR)

A Meeting at the Vatican. Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani met with Pope Francis to discuss the nuclear accord and “problems afflicting the Middle East.” It’s the first time in nearly 17 years that an Iranian leader has met with the pope. (Elisabetta Povoledo, The New York Times)

Tomorrow in One Paragraph: Nearly the entire field of presidential candidates will be in Iowa as the state’s caucuses approach—Hillary Clinton, Martin O’Malley, and Bernie Sanders for the Democrats; Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Chris Christie, John Kasich, Carly Fiorina, Mike Huckabee, and Rick Santorum for the GOP. Donald Trump makes his way to South Carolina.


Follow stories throughout the day with our new Politics & Policy page. And keep on top of the campaign with our 2016 Distilled election dashboard.


Top Read:

“Investigators have zeroed in on the cause of the accident, but they may never fully comprehend Brandon Bostian’s state of mind on May 12. This is the last real mystery of the wreck of Amtrak 188—a mystery only Bostian can help solve. And for now, he isn’t talking publicly.” The New York Times’ Matthew Shaer on the investigation into the derailment of Amtrak 188.


Top Lines

Who’s the Real Champion? Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton both support women’s rights, but Sanders is struggling to “champion” issues in the way that the leaders of the largest reproductive-rights groups want to see from a president. (Charlotte Alter, Time)

‘The New Segregationism.’ Uproar over the dearth of diversity in the Oscar nominations displays a similar “corrosive racial politics” to the debate over safe spaces on college campuses. (Victor Davis Hanson, National Review)


Top Views

The Rise of Trump. A Wall Street Journal interactive graphic provides a glimpse into who’s supporting the Republican frontrunner.

ICYMI. The Democratic presidential candidates took the stage for a town-hall-style event in Des Moines Monday night. The Guardian has a short roundup of the highlights.


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