This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal

With awards season upon us, TV and movie celebrities are getting ready to walk down red carpets. Until the very last Oscars after-party wraps up, stars will fuss about how to look their best for the cameras. Next America has some sartorial suggestions for our most beloved leading ladies and one gentleman.

Lupita Nyong’o

Since winning an Oscar in 2013, the Mexico-born actress of Kenyan origin became a favorite not only of Hollywood’s movie-making elite but a style icon praised by editors for her bold minimalist choices on the red carpet. This illusion deep V-neck gown with Swarovski crystals from French label On Aura Tout Vu would be a nice escape from her red-carpet fashion routine as it is a bit more revealing than Nyong’o would normally go for but the A-line skirt in black and white matches her love for classic cuts.

(Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP; On Aura Tout Vu)

Demi Lovato

When Lovato revealed that she has struggled with eating disorders in the past, she also admitted that her Latino roots have helped her to accept her body and to understand that “in the Latina culture, that is beautiful.” So it comes as no surprise that for her red carpet appearances she often picks feminine, curve-fitting gowns. This sexy spaghetti strap dress by Laquan Smith is a red-hot show-stopper that Lovato could easily pull off.

(Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP; Laquan Smith)

Aziz Ansari

The Master of None co-creator and actor once said that he doesn’t know who Christian Dior is, but that doesn’t stop him from looking sharp every time he hits the red carpet. And even though it’s obvious that classic black agrees with him, this year he could go for something more fun like this mismatched suit of grey jacket and navy pants from emerging Mexican designer/architect Carlos Garciavelez.

(Matt Sayles/Invision/AP; Garciavelez)

Taraji P. Henson

After the debut of her hit TV show Empire in January, Taraji P. Henson has nabbed two Emmy nominations. The actress/singer also has won over fashion editors who love her red-carpet choices that are often figure-flattering and sophisticated.

This mint number by New York-based duo Cushnie et Ochs, who are known for their sensual body-contouring silhouettes, would look elegant and fresh on her.

(Evan Agostini/Invision/AP; Cushnie et Ochs)

Priyanka Chopra

Bollywood star and Miss World winner Priyanka Chopra is known to U.S. audiences for the TV series Quantico where she plays a rookie FBI agent wrongfully accused of taking part in a terrorist attack.

This elegant silk pink dress by Korean designer Son Jung Wan would be perfect for Chopra with its classic silhouette and sexy side cutouts.

(Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP; Son Jung Wan)

Laverne Cox

The star of Orange Is the New Black (nominated for a Screen Actors Guild award for best comedy ensemble)  is a pro when it comes to red carpets. She has not been afraid to experiment with lengths and styles varying from this Hollywood glamour-inspired gown to a fun, plunging jumpsuit. Because it’s clear that she can pretty much pull off any look, we picked this fitted gown from Lebanese-American designer Rami Kadi. It is a combination of a classic mermaid black skirt with sexy, strategically placed embroidery at the top.

(Danny Moloshok/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images; Rami Kadi)

Gina Rodriguez

This year, the Chicago-raised actress of Puerto Rican descent became only the second Latina to win a Golden Globe award. Rodriguez’s effortless beauty on and off the small screen has become muse for designers like Badgley Mischka and Narciso Rodriguez.

She would be a vision in this white A-line dress by up-and-coming American label Azede Jean-Pierre, which has already generated a substantial buzz for its cool and quirky, yet elegant looks.

(Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP; Azede Jean-Pierre)

This article is from the archive of our partner National Journal.

This story is part of our Next America: Workforce project, which is supported by a grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

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